Storm Bradford and the Mortgage Fraud Examiners are not the only scams you need to watch out for, here are some more:

Storm Bradford Mortgage Fraud Examiners scam

As many homeowners already know Storm Bradford of the Mortgage Fraud Examiners website scams homeowners out of hard earned money by selling a worthless audit while pretending to be a lawyer. Unfortunately his is not the only scam people need to look out for.  Here is an email from someone who, like FRAUD STOPPERS, is concerned for protecting people from scams like Storm Bradford of the Mortgage Fraud Examiners and many other scams hurting people.

Hi there,

It’s a sad fact that there are a lot of people in the world who want to take advantage of others. That’s why fraud prevention is a year-round topic, and I’m glad sites like yours are educating your readers on pages like this one about how to avoid being scammed at: https://www.fraudstoppers.org

If you’re interested in adding more information to that page (or somewhere else on your site), here are a few suggestions that I think will be helpful for your readers:

5 ways to detect a phishing email – with examples

Malware Threats: 7 Ways To Protect Your Computer

New Scams That Seniors Need to Be Aware Of

Preventing Home Improvement Fraud

9 Safety Tips for Avoiding the Most Common Craigslist Scams

So you fell for a cyber scam — here’s what to do next

Great job keeping people informed, and thanks for letting me make a small contribution!

Thanks!

Best,
Karyn

 

5 ways to detect a phishing email – with examples

1. The message is sent from a public email domain

No legitimate organisation will send emails from an address that ends ‘@gmail.com’. Not even Google. Most organisations, except some small operations, will have their own email domain and company accounts. For example, legitimate emails from Google will read ‘@google.com’. Read more here

 

Storm Bradford Mortgage Fraud Examiners scamming homeowners by selling fake audits

 

Malware Threats: 7 Ways To Protect Your Computer

Has your computer been moving slower than normal? There may be a reason—malicious software. When the performance of our hardware begins to behave unusually, our default reaction is to think that it’s a virus. Though a virus is always a possibility, more often than not the issue is a specific type of infection known as malware. What preventive measures can you take against popular malware like ransomware, phishing, and cryptojacking? Here’s a seven-step plan.

  1. Only Use Trusted Antivirus and Malware Software
  2. Configure Regular Scans and Monitor Settings
  3. Always Update Your Operating System
  4. Rely Only On Secure Networks (Encrypted)
  5. Employ Browser Common Sense
  6. Keep a Tight Grip on Your Personal Information
  7. Stay Up-to-Date on the Latest Attacks

Read more here  

New Scams That Seniors Need to Be Aware Of

Scammers are exploiting concerns about the quarantine by taking advantage of people’s fear and anxiety to perpetrate various cons. Imposters and malefactors prey upon seniors with phishing scams, fraudulent miracle cures, and illegal robocalls in order to profit or steal your valuable information. These scams are so prevalent, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) made a bingo game out of them!

Seniors are often targeted because they usually have money. However, older adults are also very vulnerable to scams because they are isolated or not very tech savvy. This is a time to be extra vigilant and careful. Read on for the most common scams, red flags to look out for, how to protect yourself, and what to do if you are targeted.

Read more here

Preventing Home Improvement Fraud

by HomeAdvisor

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Beware: Seniors most at-risk
  • Signs of fraud
  • Questions to ask
  • How to protect yourself
  • Organizations that help
  • How we vet contractors
  • References

Introduction

A home improvement project can be overwhelming, and hiring a contractor often helps to ease the tension. However, scammers sometimes appear and offer their services for what sounds like a good deal, only to take the money and run. It’s estimated that anywhere from 20,000 to 100,000 scammers make attempts every year on homeowners, some with great success to the detriment of others.1 In 2011, consumer protection agencies recovered almost $147 million from contractor scams in 22 states.2 This money could have been protected in the first place had homeowners taken simple steps to check these contractors. The key in any remodeling situation with a contractor is to take steps to protect you and to not rush into the contracting job. If you vet the contractor and don’t hand over cash before the contracting deal starts, you will stand a better chance of not being scammed and getting a good remodeling job done for the right amount of money. Below are some resources to help you prevent personal home improvement fraud. You can also find more information on organizations and groups that help those dealing with home repair scams and who to contact if you feel approached by a fake contractor.  

Beware: Seniors most at-risk

Seniors are the most at-risk when it comes to fraudulent contractors and home improvement scams. Why are they preyed upon more than other types of homeowners? First, seniors own more than half of all the financial assets in the United States, making them prime targets. 30 percent of all scam cases in the United States list seniors as victims. Research shows that seniors are more susceptible to scams than other age groups, either because they’re more open or polite.3 In terms of fraudulent contractors, the US Department of Health estimates that 60 percent of the elderly live in homes 20 years or older. These homes usually need updates and renovations like walkways and other improvements for better accessibility.4 As such, when a fraudulent contractors comes to offer a deal, seniors do not ask as many questions or complete background checks because they need the work done. When they realize they have been duped, they will often not report it for fear of shame or being put in a home. If they do decide to report the home improvement scam, they will usually remember fewer details about the crime.5 Read more here  

9 Safety Tips for Avoiding the Most Common Craigslist Scams

1. Familiarize Yourself with the Most Common Signs of Craigslist Scams

Because Craigslist is still the world largest virtual bulletin board, the most common scams are fairly well-known. The best way to avoid them is to be aware of the most frequently used Craigslist scams in the first place. The most common Craigslist scams are:

  • Listings that don’t require a credit check for homes, cars, or other used vehicles (usually, this is a way to get your personal information, or put you in crippling debt)
  • Requesting a wire transfer to either steal your money without giving you anything, or get your bank information
  • Posting an item for sale that they don’t have, and including generic photos of the product in question
  • Spamming Craigslist with dozens (or hundreds) of postings for the same item
  • Requesting to use PayPal, then sending you a link to sign up (it’s a phishing scam, so don’t click that link!)
  • Someone who wants to buy from you, or wants you to buy from them sight unseen (they’re stealing or robbing your identity, plain and simple).

When you see one of these common scams, proceed with extreme caution, or better yet, abandon them – you’ll find something better soon, we promise. Read more here  

So you fell for a cyber scam — here’s what to do next

KEY POINTS
  • You might get scammed this holiday season. If you do, here are the steps you should take next.
  • If you think your Social Security Number was stolen, set up credit monitoring and consider a credit freeze.
  • If you’ve given your banking info away, get on the phone to your bank as soon as you can.

It’s almost Christmas. You’re stressed. Someone called demanding your full credit card number, Social Security Number and bank account number to finish that online toy purchase you just made. And you blurted them out.

 

Or maybe you got spooked by a phony IRS pitch. Or entered your bank account info into one of those well-crafted but fraudulent emails. Cybercrimes come in a variety of forms, and they are all stressful. So we broke down how to respond to five of the most common scams that might strike you or a loved one over the holidays, based on what the crooks may have gotten: Your Social Security Number, your bank account or credit card, access to your hardware or files, your pride or, worst of all, your hard-earned money.

You gave your Social Security Number away

Credit monitoring. If you suspect somebody has your Social Security Number — whether they stole it from a company (like Equifax) or you gave it to them voluntarily —  it’s important to set up credit monitoring. Typically your bank or the company that was breached will provide this to you for free. You generally shouldn’t pay for credit monitoring, as high quality free products have proliferated in the marketplace particularly after the incident at Equifax. Paid credit monitoring services can be tricky to cancel, and you can typically achieve the same level of service with a free product. Read more here

If you need great legal insurance, identity theft protection, gun owner insurance, or instant affordable access to a local attorney for help with any legal issue life throws at you, get a personal legal plan by clicking here

 

Storm Bradford Mortgage Fraud Examiners scamming homeowners by selling fake audits

FRAUD STOPPERS SCAMMING HOMEOWNERS WITH LIES AND DISINFORMATION

Regardless of your current mortgage loan situation or foreclosure situation FRAUD STOPPERS can help you improve your odds of winning with legal education and attorney services that are needed. FRAUD STOPPERS is not scamming homeowners with lies and disinformation. The real scammer is Storm (Norman) Bradford of the Mortgage Fraud Examiners and other get rich quick scam websites or URL domains he owns.

Mr. Storming Norman Bradford as a bad habit of trash talking everyone in this industry to redirect traffic to his scam website so he can peddle this worthless appraisal fraud audit, sometimes scamming innocent homeowners out of as much as $7500 for this audit.

One of his victims told me she paid him $5000 and never got her audit after complaining for months, until finally the judge who was waiting for her so called evidence (see disclaimer on audit it does not include an expert witness affidavit and is not admissible. But don’t worry because quote “You wont even need to go to court because there just going to fall down and offer you a settlement.” Or some horse radish like that.

Follow by Email
YouTube
YouTube
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Share