State Foreclosure Laws and Timelines

Foreclosure is a legal process through which lenders reclaim properties from borrowers who can no longer afford to meet their monthly mortgage obligations. Home foreclosure laws and procedures vary from state-to-state. So depending on where you live — or where you’re looking to buy — the foreclosure timeline can and often does change. Below is a list of state foreclosure laws timeline that is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the process throughout the United States. Click on any state name to drill down and learn more details about the foreclosure procedures in that state. IF you are facing foreclosure or you have already lost your home to foreclosure please read the information below this chart of state foreclosure laws for information on how FRAUD STOPPERS can help you sue for legal remedy.

 

Now is the perfect time to stand up for your legal rights and sue for mortgage and foreclosure fraud because the legal tide is beginning to turn, and homeowners are starting to win!

 

United States Foreclosure Laws

Alabama Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies by Process; Typically 30 – 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: 12 months

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Alabama, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. However, when no power of sale is present, lenders may, at their option, choose to forego a lawsuit and foreclose by selling the property, as outlined below in the “No Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. However, if the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause, but does not specify the time, place and terms of sale, then a foreclosure sale may take place at the front or main door of the courthouse of the county where the property located, after default of the deed of trust or mortgage, for cash to the highest bidder. The sale may not take place until thirty (30) days after the last notice of sale is published.

Said notice of sale must be given by publication once a week for four (4) successive weeks in a newspaper published in the county or counties in which the property is located. If the property is under mortgage in more than one county, the publication is to be made in all counties where it is located. The notice of sale must give the time, place and terms of said sale, together with a description of the property. If no newspaper is published in the county where the lands are located, the notice shall be placed in a newspaper published in an adjoining county for four (4) successive weeks.

No Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If no power of sale is contained in a mortgage or deed of trust, the lender, or any assignee thereof, may, after default of the mortgage or deed of trust, either file a lawsuit to foreclose or foreclose by selling the property to the highest bidder for cash at the

courthouse door of the county where the property is situated. Said sale may not take place until after notice of the time, place, terms and purpose of the sale has been published for four (4) consecutive weeks in a newspaper published in the county wherein said lands, or a portion thereof are situated.

 

Alaska Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies by Process; Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies by Process

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies by Process

In Alaska, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, has been instituted more since the late 1980’s, when lenders found that they were foreclosing on residential property worth substantially less than the amount owed. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

In the case of judicial foreclosure, the process is carried out according to the rules of equity, deficiency suits are permitted and the borrower has no rights of redemption.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed, provided it meets the minimum protection laws set forth by the State of Alaska. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out in the following three phases:

The trustee must record a notice of default in the office of the recorder of the recording district in which the property is located not less than thirty (30) days after the default and not less than three (3) months before the sale.

Said notice of default must state the name of the borrower, the book and page where the deed is recorded and it must describe the property, the borrower’s default, the amount the borrower owes, and the trustee’s desire to sell. It must also state the date, time and place of the sale.

Within ten (10) days after recording the notice of default, the trustee must mail a copy of the same by certified mail to the last know address of (1) the borrower, and (2) any person whose claim or lien on the property appears of record or is known to the lender of trustee and (3) any occupant. The trustee may have the notice delivered personally instead of sending it by certified mail.

Any time before the sale, the borrower may cure the default and stop the sale by paying a sum equal to the missed payments plus attorney’s fees. The lender may not require the borrower to pay off the entire remaining principal balance of the loan to cure the default, just the missed payments and attorney’s fees. If the lender has recorded a notice of default two or more times, then the Alaska statutes provide that the lender can refuse to accept the borrower’s monies for the missed payments and attorney’s fees and proceed with the foreclosure sale instead.

The sale must be made at a public auction held at the front door of a courthouse of the superior court in the judicial district where the property is located. The trustee must sell to the highest and best bidder and the lender may bid at auction.

The trustee may postpone sale of all or any portion of the property by delivering to the person conducting the sale a written and signed request for the postponement to a stated date and hour. The person conducting the sale shall publicly announce the postponement to the stated date and hour at the time and place originally fixed for the sale. This procedure shall be followed in any succeeding postponement.

When this type of foreclosure process is used, the borrower has a right to redeem the property and deficiency suits are not allowed.

More information on Alaska foreclosure laws.

Arizona Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: None

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In Arizona, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

The trustee must record a notice of sale in the office of the recorder of the county where the property is located. Within five (5) days after the notice is recorded, the trustee must mail, by certified mail, a copy of the notice of sale to each of the people who are parties to the trust deed, except for himself. Additionally, the notice must appear in a newspaper in the county where the property is located once a week for four (4) consecutive weeks, with the last notice being published not less than ten (10) days prior to the date of the sale.

Optionally, if it can be done without a breach of the peace, the trustee can post the notice at least twenty (20) days prior to the date of the sale, in some conspicuous place on the property to be sold and/or he or she can post the notice at the courthouse or at a specified place at the place of business of the trustee in the county in which the property is located.

The trustee or the trustee’s agent must conduct the sale. The sale is for cash to the highest bidder, except that the lender can make a “credit bid,” which means to cancel out some part (or all) of the money the borrower owed the lender on the lean, instead of paying cash. A successful high bidder must pay the bid price by 5 pm of the day after the bid, other than a Saturday or legal holiday. Every bid is an irrevocable offer until the sale is completed, which happens when the bidder pays the bid price to the trustee’s satisfaction. If the high bidder fails to make the payment by 5:00 pm, the day after being notified of the option to buy, then the trustee may postpone the sale.

The trustee may postpone the sale to another time, or another place, by giving notice of the new date, time and place by public declaration at the last place and time the property was offered for sale. No other notice is required. A trustee may also, by written agreement, extend the time for a buyer to come up with the payment.

Once the sale is complete, the proceeds will go to the payment of the obligations secured by the deed of trust that was foreclosed, then to junior lien holders in order of their priority. The successful bidder gets a trustee’s deed, which provides conclusive evidence that the trustee conducted the foreclosure sale property.

A note regarding Deficiency Suits: A lender may not bring a deficiency suit against a person who lost a property that is 2.5 acres or less at a foreclosure, provided the property was a single one-family or a single two-family dwelling. This is so even if the high bid at foreclosure was less that the balance due on the loan. However, in foreclosures against other types of property, a deficiency suit is allowed, but is limited to the difference between the balance owed and the fair market value of the property, and then only if the suit is brought within ninety (90) days of the power of sale foreclosure.

More information on Arizona foreclosure laws.

 

Arkansas Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In Arkansas, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process. However, an appraisal of the property must be made prior to the schedule date of foreclosure.

In any foreclosure under a mortgage or deed of trust in Arkansas, the property must sell for not less than two-thirds of the appraised value. If it does not, then it may be offered for sale again within twelve (12) months. The second sale may be to the highest bidder without reference to the previous appraisal.

Judicial Foreclosure

In judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, then the clerk of the court, as commissioner, advertises the property for sale.

Sales of real property under court order will be on a credit of not less than three (3) months, but not more than six (6) months, or on installments to not more than four (4) months credit overall. To secure payment, a lien will be retained on the property for its price and the purchaser must also give a bond with surety for the amount of the purchase price.

The lender may bid at the sale by crediting a portion (or all) of the amount the court found was owed to the lender against the sales price of the property purchased at the foreclosure sale. If the real estate does not sell for an amount equal to what’s due on the mortgage loan, then the lender may seize other property from the borrower as in an ordinary judgment.

The borrower has one (1) year from the date of the sale to redeem the property by paying the amount for which the property was sold, plus interest.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

The trustee must record a notice of sale in the office of the recorder of the county where the property is located. The mortgagee’s or trustee’s notice of default and intention to sell shall be mailed within thirty (30) days of the recording of the notice by certified mail to the borrower. This includes any borrower of record or of whom the lender has actual notice. The notice must also be mailed to anyone who records a Request for Notice that specifically described the mortgagee including its recording information.

Within five (5) days after the notice is recorded, the trustee must mail, by certified mail, a copy of the notice of sale to each of the people who are parties to the trust deed, except for himself. Additionally, the notice of default and intention to sell must appear in a newspaper in the county where the property is located once a week for four (4) consecutive weeks, with the last notice being published not less than ten (10) days prior to the date of the sale.

Said notice of default and intention to sell must contain the names of the parties to the mortgage or deed of trust, a legal description of the trust property and, if applicable, the street address of the property, the book and page numbers where the mortgage or deed of trust is recorded or the recorder’s document number, the default for which foreclosure is made, the mortgagee’s or trustee’s intention to sell the trust property to satisfy the obligation, including, in conspicuous type, a warning as follows: “YOU MAY LOSE YOUR PROPERTY IF YOU DO NOT TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION” and the time, date, and place of sale.

Any person including the mortgagee (lender) may bid at the sale, except the trustee, who may bid on the behalf of the beneficiary (lender) but not for himself or herself in deed of trust sales. The high bidder must pay the price bid at the time of sale, or within ten (10) days. The lender may bid by canceling out what it is owed on the loan, including unpaid taxes, insurance, costs or sale and maintenance, but for cash for any higher price.

The trustee may postpone the sale by public proclamation at the time, place and date last appointed for sale, up to seven (7) days past the original date, but if for a longer time, then the whole notice procedure must be performed a second time, including the sixty (60) day wait.

Once the sale is complete, the proceeds will go to the pay for the expenses of the foreclosure sale, then toward the obligations secured by the trust deed that was foreclosed and then to junior lien holders in order of their priority. The original borrower is entitled to receive any remaining funds. The successful bidder receives a trustee’s deed.

The lender may sue the borrower for a deficiency within twelve (12) months of a power of sale clause foreclosure. The lender may sue for (1) the difference between the foreclosure sale price and the balance due on the loan, or (2) the balance due on the loan minus the fair market value of the property, whichever is less.

More information on Arkansas foreclosure laws

California Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In California, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Using this type of foreclosure process, lenders may seek a deficiency judgment and under certain circumstances, the borrower may have up to one (1) year to redeem the property.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

A notice of sale must be: 1) recorded in the county where the property is located at least fourteen (14) days prior to the sale; 2) mailed by certified, return receipt requested, to the borrower at least twenty (20) days before the sale; 3) posted on the property itself at least twenty (20) days before the sale; and 4) posted in one (1) public place in the county where the property is to be sold.

The notice of sale must contain the time and location of the foreclosure sale, as well as the property address, the trustee’s name, address and phone number and a statement that the property will be sold at auction.

The borrower has up until five days before the foreclosure sale to cure the default and stop the process.

The sale may be held on any business day between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm and must take place at the location specified in the notice of sale. The trustee may require proof of the bidders ability to pay their full bid amount. Anyone may bid at the sale, which must be made at public auction to the highest bidder. If necessary, the sale may be postponed by announcement at the time and location of the original foreclosure sale.

Lenders may not seek a deficiency judgment after a non-judicial foreclosure sale and the borrower has no rights of redemption.

More information on California foreclosure laws.

 

Colorado Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically four months

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Colorado, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

The foreclosure process in Colorado is quite a bit different than in other states because here, the governor appoints a “Public Trustee” for each county in the state. The trustee must act as an impartial party when handling a power of sale foreclosure. In Colorado, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

The process begins when the attorney representing the lender files the required documents with the Office of the Public Trustee of the county where the property is located. The Public Trustee then files a “Notice of Election and Demand” with the county clerk and recorder of the county. Once recorded, the notice must be published in a newspaper of general circulation within the county where the property is located for a period of five (5) consecutive weeks.

The Public Trustee must also mail, within ten (10) days after the publication of the notice of election and demand for sale, a copy of the same and a notice of sale as published in the newspaper, to the borrower and any owner or claimant of record, at the address given in the recorded instrument. The Public Trustee must also mail, at lease twenty-one (21) days before the foreclosure sale, a notice to the borrower describing how to redeem the property.

The owner of the property may stop the foreclosure proceedings by filing an “Intent to Cure” with the Public Trustee’s office at least fifteen (15) days prior to the foreclosure sale and then paying the necessary amount to bring the loan current by noon the day

before the foreclosure sale is scheduled.

The foreclosure sale must take place between forty-five (45) and sixty (60) days after the recording of the election and demand for sale with the county clerk and recorder. The Public Trustee may hold the sale at any entrance to the courthouse, unless other provisions were made in the deed of trust.

The lender has the option to file a suit for deficiency in Colorado and the borrower has up to seventy-five (75) days after the sale to redeem the property by paying the foreclosure sale amount, plus interest.

More information on Colorado foreclosure laws.

 

Connecticut Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Connecticut, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process in Connecticut is carried out by either strict foreclosure or a decree of sale.

With strict foreclosure, no actual foreclosure sale is held. Instead, the lender goes to court to try and obtain a court order demonstrating the borrower is in default of the mortgage. If successful, the title transfers to the lender immediately.

However, the court sets an established amount of time in which the borrower may redeem the property, but if they fail to do so, the title becomes absolute to the lender and the borrower has no longer has any claim to the property. The lender then has thirty (30) days to record a certificate of foreclosure, which must contain a description of the property, the foreclosure proceedings, the mortgage and the date the title became absolute.

With a decree of sale, the court: 1) establishes the time and manner of the sale; 2) appoints a committee to sell the property; and 3) appoints three appraisers to determine the value of the property.

The borrower may stop the foreclosure proceedings at any time before the sale by paying the balance due on the mortgage. If no such payment is made, the committee will go forward with the sale.

The lender may sue to obtain a deficiency judgment in Connecticut.

More information on Connecticut foreclosure laws.

 

Delaware Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Delaware, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Lenders in Delaware are given a number of options in which they may pursue judicial foreclosure, but the most commonly used procedure is the Scire Facias.

This proceeding is quite different from other judicial foreclosures because instead of the lender having to prove the borrower is in default of the mortgage, the borrower has to prove he isn’t. Although the suit to obtain an order for foreclosure is filed by the lender, the borrower must appear in court within twenty (20) days of being served a writ to provide evidence as to why the foreclosure should not take place. Unless the court is satisfied with the borrowers explanation and evidence, they will authorize a foreclosure sale.

Said sale must be conducted by the sheriff and held either at the courthouse or at the property itself at least fourteen (14) days after the notice of sale is posted on the property and in other public places throughout the county in which it is located.

The buyer has no right of redemption once the court has confirmed the sale.

More information on Delaware foreclosure laws.

 

Florida Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 180 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Florida, all mortgages are foreclosed in equity. In a mortgage foreclosure action, the court severs, for separate trial, all counterclaims against the foreclosing lender. The foreclosure claim shall, if tried, be tried to the court without a jury.

The court order of foreclosure will specify how the foreclosure must take place, and the foreclosure must take place on those terms. Whenever a legal advertisement, publication, or notice relating to a foreclosure proceeding is required to be placed in a newspaper, it is the responsibility of the lender or their representative to place such advertisement, publication, or notice.

Equitable Right of Redemption ends at the foreclosure sale (or at another time specified by the courts, but this rarely happens). There is a period of time after the sale that “the court reviews the sale to ensure a fair price has been paid.”  Basically, this period of time allows parties to object to the sale on the basis that proper procedures were not followed or collusion existed between the bidders, for example.  This period is usually 10 days, after which the Certificate of Sale is filed and title passes, if the sale is confirmed.  If the sale is not confirmed, another sale is ordered.  (Reference F.S. Chapter 702)

The lender may sue to obtain a deficiency judgment in Florida.

More information on Florida foreclosure laws.

 

Georgia Foreclosure Law

Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Georgia, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of

sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee.

Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

A foreclosure notice must be mailed by certified mail, return receipt requested to the borrower no later than 15 days prior to the date of the foreclosure sale. The time period begins the day the letter is postmarked. The notice must be mailed to the address given to the lender by written notice from the borrower. No waiver or release of the rights to notice is valid if it was signed at the same time as the original documents.

The notice must be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the sale will be held once a week for four (4) weeks proceeding the date of the foreclosure sale.

The sale must be made by public auction on the first Tuesday of the month between 10:00 am and 4:00 p.m. at the courthouse.

Lenders may seek a deficiency judgment in Georgia.

More information on Georgia foreclosure laws.

 

Hawaii Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: None

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Hawaii, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

 

  1. The notice of intent to foreclose must be published once a week for three (3) successive weeks, the last publication to be not less than fourteen (14) days before the day of sale, in a newspaper having a general circulation in the county in which the mortgaged property is located.Copies of the notice must be mailed or delivered to the mortgagor, the borrower, any prior or junior creditors, the state director of taxation and any other person entitled to receive notice. Additionally, the notice must be posted on the premises not less than twenty-one (21) days before the day of sale.

    Said notice must state: 1) The date, time, and place of the public sale; 2) The dates and times of the two (2) open houses of the mortgaged property, or if there will not to be any open houses, the public notice shall so state; 3) The unpaid balance of the moneys owed to the mortgagee under the mortgage agreement; 4) A description of the mortgaged property, including the address or description of the location of the mortgaged property, and the tax map key number of the mortgaged property; 5) The name of the mortgagor and the borrower; 6) the name of the lender; 7) The name of any prior or junior creditors having a recorded lien on the mortgaged property before the recordation of the notice of default; 8) The name, the address in the State, and the telephone number in the State of the person in the State conducting the public sale; and 9) The terms and conditions of the public sale.

    Additional wording, as required by the State of Hawaii, may be found here.

  2. Up until three (3) days before the sale, the borrower may cure the default and stop the sale by paying the lien debt, costs and reasonable attorney’s fees, unless otherwise agreed to between the lender and the borrower.
  3. The sale, which may be held no earlier than fourteen (14) days after the last ad is published, is to be made at auction to the highest bidder.
  4. Any sale, in which notice has been given, may be postponed from time to time by public announcement made by the lender or their representative.

There are no rights of redemption in Hawaii.

More information on Hawaii foreclosure laws

 

Idaho Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust

–  Timeline: Typically 150 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Idaho, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts in default using the non-judicial foreclosure process.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

The notice of sale must be recorded in the county where the property is located and given to the borrower and the occupants of the property (if not the borrower) at least one hundred twenty (120) days before the date of the sale.

The notice must be published in the newspapers in the county where the property is located at least once a week for four (4) consecutive weeks. The final ad must be run not less than thirty (30) days in advance of the foreclosure. The published notice must contact a legal description of the property, its street address and the name and phone number of someone who can give directions.

Said notice must describe the nature of the default, a legal description of the property, as well its street address, the lender’s name, the date, time, and place of the sale, and the name and phone number of the person conducting the sale.

The foreclosure sale must take place on the date, at the time and at the place specified in the notice. However, the sale may be postponed and held at a new time and place, so long as it is within thirty (30) days of the originally scheduled sale.

If the property consists of more than twenty (20) acres, the buyer has a period of one (1) year to redeem said property. If it is less than twenty (20) acres, the period of time is lessened to six months.

Click here for more information on Idaho foreclosure laws.

 

Illinois Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 210 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

Lenders in Illinois have a number of options available to them to foreclose on a mortgage in default.

Judicial Foreclosure

A notice of the lenders intent to foreclose must be given to the borrower, and any other person entitled by Illinois statutes to receive notice, at least thirty (30) days prior to the courts judgment of foreclosure.

If the court finds in favor of the lender and issues a notice of sale, the sale will be conducted on the terms and conditions specified in the notice of sale, provided they meet the minimum standards provided in the Illinois Statutes.

The sheriff or any judge within the county where the property is located may conduct the sale. The borrower has no rights of redemption after the foreclosure sale.

Deed in Lieu of Foreclosure

If the borrower has defaulted on the mortgage and the lender agrees, the borrower may simply give the deed to the lender and his interests in the property securing the deed will be terminated. If the lender agrees and accepts the deed, they may not seek to obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower at any time afterward.

Consent Foreclosure

In this type of foreclosure, the court enters a judgment satisfying the mortgage by giving absolute title to the property secured by the mortgage to the lender. The borrower has no rights of redemption after this type of foreclosure judgment has been rendered and the lender may not file for a deficiency judgment.

Lenders may also foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the common law strict foreclosure method, but Illinois law does not permit non-judicial power of sale foreclosures.

Click here for more information on Illinois foreclosure laws.

 

Indiana Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 150 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Indiana, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder. However, there is a wait time between the date the suit was filed and the day the property is sold.

In Indiana, the date the mortgage was signed determines the length of time a lender must wait between filing the suit and proceeding with the foreclosure sale. The wait time is anywhere from three (3) to twelve (12) months, but the owner may file a waiver of the time limit, which allows the sale to proceed without delay. When this occurs, the lender loses the right to pursue a deficiency judgment.

The foreclosure sale process involves publishing an ad once a week for three weeks. The first ad must be run 30 days before the sale. At the time the first ad is run, each owner must be served with notice of the foreclosure sale by the sheriff. The sheriff conveys title by a deed given immediately after the sale. The owner may reside in the property, rent free, until the foreclosure sale, provided the owner is not committing waste, which means tearing up the property.

More information on Indiana foreclosure laws.

 

Iowa Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 150

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Iowa, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default using either the judicial or the alternative non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold.

Notice of the sale must be posted in at least three public places of the county, one of which shall be at the county courthouse. In addition, there shall be two weekly publications of such notice in some newspaper printed in the county, with the first publication being at least four weeks before the date of sale, and the second at a later time before the date of sale. If the borrower is in actual occupation and possession of the property, the notice must be served on them at least twenty days prior to the date of the sale.

The sale must be at public auction, between 9:00 am and 4:00 pm and the time must be stated clearly in the notice of sale. The sheriff shall receive and give a receipt for a sealed written bid submitted prior to the public auction. The sheriff may require all sealed written bids to be accompanied by payment of any fees required to be paid at the public auction by the purchaser, to be returned if the person submitting the sealed written bid is not the purchaser. The sheriff must keep all written bids sealed until the commencement of the public auction, at which time the sheriff will open and announce the written bids as though made in person.

The sale may be postponed, but if it postponed for more than three days, notice of the new sale must be publicly announced at the time the sale was to have been made.

Alternative non-judicial foreclosure procedure

Borrowers in Iowa have the option of avoiding a foreclosure suit by voluntarily conveying all of their rights in the property secured by the mortgage to the lender. If the lender accepts the conveyance from the borrower, they are given immediate access to the property. However, they must waive any rights to file for a deficiency judgment against the borrower.

Additionally, the borrower is required to sign a “disclosure of notice and cancellation”, which states, among other things, that they are voluntarily giving up their rights to reclaim or occupy the property. The borrower and lender must also file a jointly executed document with the county recorders office stating that they have chosen to proceed with the foreclosure using the voluntary foreclosure procedures.

More information on Iowa foreclosure laws.

 

Kansas Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Kansas, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

The notice of the time and sale must be advertised once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, with the last publication being no more than fourteen (14) and no less than seven (7) days before the scheduled date of sale. Notice of the sale must also be sent to the borrower within five (5) days of the first advertisement.

Unless otherwise ordered by the court, the sale is typically held at the courthouse of the county in which the property resides. The sale is by public auction to the highest bidder, who will receive a certificate of purchase. After the sale is confirmed, the winning bidder will be entitled to receive a sheriff’s deed, which will vest good and perfect title to the foreclosure bidder, once the borrowers right of redemption has expired. The borrower typically has twelve (12) months from the date of the foreclosure sale to redeem the property.

Lenders may sue to obtain a deficiency judgment for the difference between the foreclosure sale price and the amount due on the original mortgage.

More information on Kansas foreclosure laws.

 

Kentucky Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes, but with restrictions

In Kentucky, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the clerk of the court then advertises the property for sale.

At some point prior to the scheduled date of foreclosure, an appraisal of the property must be made. If the foreclosure sale price is less than two-thirds of the appraised value, the borrower has a period of one year (12 months) from the date of the sale to redeem the property by paying the amount for which the property was sold, plus interest.

It is possible to obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower for the difference between the amount the borrower owed on the original loan and the foreclosure sale price, but only if the borrower was personally served with the lawsuit, or failed to answer.

More information on Kentucky foreclosure laws.

 

Louisiana Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Louisiana, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

There are two types of judicial foreclosure proceedings in Louisiana, executory and ordinary process.

The executory process takes place when the lender uses a mortgage that includes an “authentic act that imparts a confession of judgment”, as provided in the Louisiana statutes. Essentially, this means the borrower signed and acknowledged the obligations of the mortgage in the presence of a notary public and two witnesses. This type of mortgage makes the foreclosure process easier for the lender because once the suit has been filed and the original note and a certified copy of the mortgage has been provided, the court will issue an order for the process to begin.

Once ordered, the borrower must be then be served with a demand for the delinquent payments. The borrower has three (3) days to provide the delinquent payments or the court will order a writ of seizure and sale and the property will be sold after proper notice has been advertised for thirty (30) days.

Lenders may also sue to obtain a deficiency judgment, but buyers have no rights of redemption.

More information on Louisiana foreclosure laws.

 

Maine Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Maine, lenders may foreclose on mortgages in default by using either a judicial or strict foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Although Maine allows lenders to pursue foreclosure by judicial methods, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, it is only used in special circumstances. The primary method of foreclosure in Maine is strict foreclosure.

Strict Foreclosure

The strict foreclosure process is based on Maine’s foreclosure doctrine in which the lender owns the property until the mortgage has been paid in full. If the borrower breaks any of the conditions established in the mortgage prior to the time the loan is paid in full, he or she will lose any right to the property and the lender will either take possession of the property or arrange for it’s sale.

In either case, the borrower has either a three (3) month (post-1975 mortgages) or a twelve (12) month (pre-1975 mortgages) redemption period. If the lender has taken possession of the property, they must hold possession of it for the entire redemption period to finalize the foreclosure. If the lender chooses to sell the property without taking possession of it first, they must file an initial suit and then wait until the redemption period has passed to sell the property by special procedures set forth by the court.

The lender may file a for a deficiency judgment, but it is limited to the difference between the fair market value, as determined by an appraisal, and the balance of the loan in default.

More information on Maine foreclosure laws.

 

Maryland Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes, with restrictions

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Maryland, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage or deed of trust in default using either the judicial, assent to decree, or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

In cases where the security instrument contains neither a power of sale nor an assent to a decree, a lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. The court will then determine whether a default has occurred.

If the court finds that a default has occurred it shall: 1) fix the amount of the debt, interest, and costs then due; and 2) provide a reasonable time within which payment may be made. The court may order that if payment is not made within the time fixed in the order, the property must be sold to satisfy the debt.

Assent To Decree Foreclosure

Assent to a decree foreclosure is used when a provision in the security document declares an assent to the entry of an order for the sale of the property upon a specified default. Lenders who use the assent to decree foreclosure must file a complaint to foreclose. However, it is not necessary for a hearing to be held prior to the foreclosure sale.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee.

Despite the permission given in the power of sale clause, lenders in Maryland must still file an order to docket before foreclosure proceedings can begin. However, it is not necessary for a hearing to be held prior to the foreclosure sale.

Foreclosure Guidelines

Unless otherwise stated in the original loan document or ordered by the court, the following guidelines must be adhered to in any foreclosure proceedings:

  1. A notice of sale must be published in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property resides at least once a week for three (3) successive weeks, with the first publication to be not less than fifteen (15) days prior to sale and the last publication to be not more than one week prior to sale. The notice of sale must also be sent by certified and by registered mail, not more than thirty (30) days and not less than ten (10) days before the date of the sale, to the borrower at their last known address.
  2. The sale must be conducted by the person authorized to make the sale (i.e. trustee, sheriff) and may take place immediately outside the courthouse entrance, on the property itself or the location advertised in the notice of sale, if different. The terms of the sale vary by process.
  3. If the sale is postponed, notice of the new date of sale shall be published in the manner the original notice of sale was given.
  4. Within thirty (30) days after the sale, the person authorized to make the sale must file a complete report of the sale with the court. The clerk of the court will then issue a notice containing a brief description to identify the property and stating that the sale will be ratified unless cause to the contrary is shown within 30 days after the date of the notice. A copy of the notice shall be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks before the expiration of the 30-day period in one or more newspapers of general circulation in the county in which the report of sale was filed.
  5. Lenders have a period of three (3) years to file for a deficiency judgment, but it is limited to the balance of the loan in default after the foreclosure sale proceeds have been applied.

More information on Maryland foreclosure laws.

 

Massachusetts Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Massachusetts, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either an entry by possession or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Foreclosure by Possession

After the borrower defaults on the mortgage, the lender may recover possession of the property by: 1) obtaining a court order; 2) entering the property peaceably; and 3) by proper consent of the buyer. If the lender maintains possession peaceably for three years from the date of possession, the borrower loses all rights of redemption.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the foreclosure may proceed as follows:

A notice of sale must be recorded in the county where the property is located. The notice must also: 1) be sent, by registered mail, to the borrower at his last known address at least fourteen (14) days prior to the foreclosure sale; 2) published once a week for three (3) weeks, with the first publication being at least twenty one (21) days before the sale, in a newspaper of general circulation within the county where the property is located.

Said notice must contain the place, time and date of the foreclosure hearing, the date the mortgage was recorded, the borrowers name, the amount of the default and the terms of the sale.

The sale must be conducted at public auction on the date, time and place specified in the notice of sale. The property will be sold to the highest bidder.

The borrower has no rights of redemption.

More information on Massachusetts foreclosure laws.

 

Michigan Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In Michigan, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

In judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, then the court will issue a notice of sale.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A notice of sale must be published once a week for four (4) in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is located. The notice must also be posted on the property at least fifteen (15) days after the first notice of sale is published.
  2. The notice must contain the borrower and lenders name, a description of the property, the terms of the sale and the time, place and date of the sale.
  3. The sale must be made at public auction to the highest bidder. The trustee or the sheriff of the county, if different, may conduct the sale between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm on the date specified in the notice of sale.
  4. The sale may be postponed by posting a notice at the time and place where the sale was to originally be held. If the postponement is for more than one week, it must also be published in the manner as the original notice of sale was given.

More information on Michigan foreclosure laws.

Minnesota Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Minnesota, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. However, in Minnesota, a non-judicial foreclosure may only occur if: 1) no lawsuit to collect the on the mortgage is already underway; 2) the mortgage and any assignments of the mortgage to new lenders have been recorded; and 3) a notice has been given eight (8) weeks before the foreclosure on a homestead.

If all of these conditions have been met, then the foreclosure may proceed as follows:

  1. A notice of sale, containing the borrower and lender(s) name, the original loan amount and current amount of default, the date of the mortgage, a description of the property and the time, place and date of the foreclosure sale, must be recorded in the county where the property resides.
  2. The sheriff of the county in which the property is located must conduct the sale on the date specified in the notice of sale. At some point during the sale, the sheriff must read an itemized statement, which has been filed by the lender, of the amount due at the time of the sale. The property is sold to the highest bidder, who will receive certificate of sale.
  3. Lenders may pursue a deficiency judgment, but it is limited to the amount of the fair marker value of the property and the unpaid balance of the original loan. Borrowers have up to one (1) year to redeem the property by paying the past due amount on the loan.

More information on Minnesota foreclosure laws.

 

Mississippi Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Mississippi, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. The trustee must record a notice of sale containing, at minimum, the borrowers name and the date, time and place of the sale in the county where the property is located. This notice must also be posted at the courthouse door in the county where the property is located and published in a newspaper of general circulation in said county for a period of three (3) consecutive weeks before the schedule date of the sale.
  2. The borrower may cure the default and stop the foreclosure process at any time before the foreclosure sale by paying the delinquent payments, plus costs and fees.
  3. The sale must be made at public auction for cash to the highest bidder. The sale may be held in the county where the property is located, or, if different, in the county where the borrower resides. In either case, the sale must be conducted at the normal location for sheriff’s sales within the given county. Borrowers who lose their property as the result of a non-judicial foreclosure have no rights of redemption in Mississippi.

More information on Mississippi foreclosure laws.

 

Missouri Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Missouri, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the foreclosure may proceed as follows:

  1. A notice of sale must be mailed the borrower, at his last known address, at least twenty (20) days prior to the scheduled day of sale. The notice of sale must also be published in a newspaper within the county.
  2. The sale is conducted by the trustee at public auction for cash to the highest bidder. Anyone may bid, including the lender. If the lender is the winning bidder, the borrower has one year (12 months) to redeem the property.

More information on Missouri foreclosure laws.

 

Montana Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 150 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In Montana, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

In judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, then the court will issue a notice of sale.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

A notice of sale must be recorded in the county where the property is located and then: 1) mailed, by registered or certified mail, to the borrower at his last known address at least 120 days before the foreclosure sale; 2) published once a week for three (3) successive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is located; and 3) posted on the property at least twenty (20) days before the foreclosure sale.

The notice must contain the time, date and place of sale, the borrowers, lenders and trustees name, a description of both the property and the default, and the book and page where the deed is recorded.

The trustee must conduct the sale between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm at the courthouse in the county where the property is located. The property must be sold at public auction to the highest bidder.

The sale may be postponed for up to fifteen (15) days by posting a notice at the time and place where the sale was originally scheduled.

Lenders may not obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower and the borrower has no rights of redemption.

More information on Montana foreclosure laws.

 

Nebraska Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 180 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In Nebraska, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the clerk of the court then advertises the property for sale.

In Nebraska, the court may order the entire property to be sold, or just some part of it. The order of sale may be delayed for up to nine (9) months after the judgment if the borrower files a written request for a delay with the clerk of the court within twenty (20) days after the judgment is rendered. Otherwise, the order commanding the sale of the mortgaged property will be given twenty (20) days after the judgment.

The borrower has the right to cure the default at any time while the suit is still pending by paying the delinquent amount owed on the mortgage, as well as any interest and costs that have accrued. However, the court may still enter a decree of foreclosure and sale, which may be enforced if the buyer goes into default on the mortgage again in the future.

The sheriff must give public notice of the time and place of the sale by:

1) posting the notice on the courthouse door; 2) posting the notice in at least five other public places in the county where the property is located; and 3) by advertising the property for sale once a week for a period of four (4) weeks in a newspaper published in the county where the property is located.

The court must confirm the sale after it takes place and once this is occurs, the borrower has no right of redemption.

More information on Nebraska foreclosure laws.

 

Nevada Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Nevada, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

The borrower has one year (12 months) after the foreclosure sale to redeem the property if the judicial foreclosure process is used.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A copy of the notice of default and election to sell must be mailed certified, return receipt requested, to the borrower, at their last known address, on the date the notice is recorded in the county where the property is located. Any additional postings and advertisements must be done in the same manner as for an execution sale in Nevada.Beginning on the day after the notice of default and election was recorded with the county and mailed to the borrower, the borrower has anywhere from fifteen (15) to thirty five (35) days to cure the default by paying the delinquent amount on the loan. The actual amount of time given is dependent on the date of the original deed of trust.
  2. The owner of the property may stop the foreclosure proceedings by filing an “Intent to Cure” with the Public Trustee’s office at least fifteen (15) days prior to the foreclosure sale and then paying the necessary amount to bring the loan current by noon the day before the foreclosure sale is scheduled.
  3. The foreclosure sale itself will be held at the place, the time and on the date stated in the notice of default and election and must be conducted in the same manner as for an execution sale of real property.

Lenders have three (3) months after the sale to try and obtain a deficiency judgment. Borrowers have no rights of redemption.

More information on Nevada foreclosure laws

 

New Hampshire Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies by Process; Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: None

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In New Hampshire, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage or deed of trust in default by using either the judicial or non-judicial foreclosure processes or any of the following special methods: Entry under Process, Entry and Publication or Possession and Publication.

Judicial Foreclosure

In New Hampshire, the judicial process of foreclosure is very similar to that of the strict foreclosure process used in other New England states. The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold. Anyone may bid at the foreclosure sale, including the lender.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out in the following phases:

A notice of sale must be recorded in the county where the property is located and then: 1) mailed to the borrower at least twenty-five (25) days before the sale; and 2) published once a week for three (3) weeks, with the first publication appearing not less than twenty (20) days before the sale, in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is located.

The notice should contain the time, date and place of sale, a description of the property and the default, as well as a “warning” to the borrower, informing him the property is going to be sold and what rights he has to stop the procedure.

The foreclosure sale must be held on the property itself, unless the power of sale clause specifies a different location.

Special Methods of Foreclosure

  1. Entry under Process – The lender may foreclose by entering the property under process of law and maintaining actual possession of the property for one year.
  2. Entry and Publication – By peaceable entry onto the property and continued, actual, peaceable possession for a period of one year, and by a publishing a notice stating the time of possession, the lender and borrowers name, the date of the mortgage and a description of the property in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is located. The notice must be published for three (3) successive weeks, with the first publication appearing at least six (6) months before the borrowers right to redeem has expired.
  3. Possession and Publication – By the lender in possession of the property publishing a notice stating that from and after a certain day, the property will be held for default of the mortgage and the borrowers rights to the property will be foreclosed. Said notice must be published in a newspaper printed in the county where the property is located for three (3) successive weeks and must give the borrower and lenders name, the date of the mortgage, a description of the property and the lenders intention to hold possession of the property for at least one (1) year.

Borrowers have no rights of redemption when any of the three (3) special methods of foreclosure are used.

More information on New Hampshire foreclosure laws.

 

New Jersey Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In New Jersey, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the clerk of the court then advertises the property for sale.

Once the process begins, a foreclosure notice must be: 1) posted in the county office of the county where the property is located; 2) posted on the property in foreclosure; and 3) published in two (2) newspapers in the county. The lender must also notify the borrower at least ten (10) days prior to the foreclosure sale.

It is possible for the lender to obtain a deficiency judgment and borrowers have a right to redemption and/or objection within ten (10) days after the sale.

More information on New Jersey foreclosure laws.

 

New Mexico Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instruments: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In New Mexico, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the court then issues a notice of sale.

The notice of sale must contain a legal description of the property and state the place, the time and the date, which must be at least thirty (30) days after the notice of sale is issued, on which the foreclosure sale is to be held. The property will then be sold to the highest bidder on the date specified in the notice.

In most cases, the borrower has up to nine (9) months to redeem the property by paying the amount of the highest bid at the foreclosure sale, plus costs and interest.

Non-judicial foreclosure is only available for commercial and business properties valued at over $500,000.

More information on New Mexico foreclosure laws.

 

New York Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In New York , lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold by the sheriff of the county or a referee.

Typically the foreclosure sale is advertised for 4 to 6 weeks. The sale is made by public auction to the highest bidder. Anyone may bid, including the lender.

After the property has been sold, the officer conducting the sale must execute a deed to the purchaser. The officer must also pay, out of the proceeds, the amount of the debt, including interest and costs, to the lender and then obtain a receipt for the payment from the lender.

Within thirty days after the completing the sale and executing the deed to the purchaser, the officer must file a report of sale, which must include the receipt from the lender, with the clerk of the court. Unless otherwise ordered by the court, the sale can’t be confirmed until three months past the filing of the report of sale.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee.

Although this type of foreclosure is permitted in New York, it is rarely used by lenders.

More information on New York foreclosure laws.

North Carolina Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In North Carolina, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. However, in North Carolina, a preliminary hearing must be held before a power of sale foreclosure can take place.

After the preliminary notices have been issued, the clerk of the court will conduct a hearing to determine whether or not a foreclosure sale may take place. If and when the clerk issues a notice of sale, the foreclosure may proceed as follows:

  1. A notice of sale must be: 1) mailed first class mail to the borrower at least twenty (20) days before the sale; 2) published in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is located once a week for two (2) successive weeks, with the last ad being published not less than ten (10) days before the sale; and 3) posted on the courthouse door for twenty (20) days prior to the foreclosure sale.
  2. Said notice must name the borrowers, the lenders, provide a description of the property and state the date, time and place of sale.
  3. The sale must be conducted at the courthouse in the county where the property is located between the hours of 10:00 am and 4:00 pm. The property will be sold to the highest bidder. Upset bids may be filed with the court clerk for a period of ten (10) days after the foreclosure sale.
  4. The sale may be postponed by announcing the need to postpone at the time and place the regular sale would have taken place. A notice of the postponement, stating the new date and time the foreclosure sale will be held, must be posted on the courthouse door.

Lenders may pursue a deficiency judgment and borrowers retain the right to redemption.

More information on North Carolina foreclosure laws.

 

North Dakota Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In North Dakota, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the clerk of the court then advertises the property for sale.

However, in North Dakota, the lender must give the borrower no less than thirty (30) days advance notice of their intent to foreclose. Said notice must be sent registered or certified mail no later than ninety (90) days before the suit is filed and must contain: 1) a description of the real estate; 2) the date and amount of the mortgage; 3) the individual amounts due for principal, interest and taxes paid by the lender; and 4) a statement that a lawsuit will be filed to foreclose if the amount is not paid within thirty (30) days from the date the notice was mailed.

The borrower may stop the foreclosure process by paying the delinquent amount, plus foreclosure costs, prior to the time the sale is confirmed by the court.

All sales in North Dakota must be made by the sheriff or his deputy of the county and in the county where the property is located. The property will be sold to the highest bidder, who will be issued a certificate of sale until the borrowers redemption period has ended. Borrowers typically have a period of one (1) year to redeem the property by paying the balance due on the loan, plus costs, but it may be only six (6) months if the mortgage includes short-term redemption rights.

It is possible to obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower in North Dakota.

More information on North Dakota foreclosure laws.

 

Ohio Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 150 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Ohio, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

Generally, in judicial foreclosure, a court decrees the amount of the borrowers debt and gives him or her a short time to pay. If the borrower fails to pay within that time, the clerk of the court then advertises the property for sale.

At some point prior to the scheduled date of foreclosure, an appraisal of the property must be made by three disinterested freeholders of the county. A copy of the appraised value must be filed with the court clerk and the property must be offered for sale at a price of not less than two-thirds of said value.

The sale may not take place until the notice of sale has been published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a

newspaper of general circulation in the county in which the property is located. The sheriff will conduct the sale at the courthouse and the property will be sold to the highest bidder.

Lender’s may obtain a deficiency judgment and the borrower may redeem the property at any time before the court confirms the foreclosure sale by paying the amount of the judgment, plus costs and interest.

More information on Ohio foreclosure laws.

Oklahoma Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: None

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In Oklahoma, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure

process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

However, unless the borrower waives the right to an appraisal in the mortgage, the property must be appraised before it can be sold at foreclosure. At the foreclosure sale, the property may not be sold for less than two-thirds of the appraised value.

A lender may sue to obtain a deficiency judgment, but the action must be taken within ninety (90) days after the date of sale. There can be no redemption once the court confirms the foreclosure sale.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

A written notice of intention to foreclose by power of sale must be sent by certified mail to the borrower at the borrower’s last known address. The notice must describe the defaults of the borrower under the loan, and give the borrower thirty five (35) days from the date the notice is sent to cure the problem. If the borrower cures the default within the thirty five (35) days, then the foreclosure can be stopped. However, if there have been three (3) defaults, then the lender need not send another notice of intent to foreclose, and if the borrower has been in default four (4) times in the past twenty four (24) months, and has been notified as above, then no further notice will be required.

  1. The notice must be recorded in the county where the property is located within ten (10) days after the borrower has gone through the thirty five (35) day notice period.
  2. The notice must appear in a newspaper in the county where the property is located once a day for four (4) consecutive weeks, with the first publishing being not less than thirty (30) days before the sale.
  3. Said notice must state the names of the borrower and lender, describe the property (including the street address) and state the time and place of sale.
  4. The property must be sold at public auction to the highest bidder at the time and on the date specified in the notice. If the highest bidder at the sale is anyone other than the borrower, they must post cash or certified funds equal to ten (10) percent of the bid amount. If the highest bidder is unable to do so, then the lender may proceed with the sale and accept the next highest bid.

More information on Oklahoma foreclosure laws.

 

Oregon Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 180 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Oregon, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

In this type of foreclosure, the borrower may redeem the property by paying the purchase price, with interest, the foreclosure costs and the purchaser’s expenses in operating and maintaining the property within 180 days after the date of sale. The borrower must file a notice no less than two (2) days and not more than thirty (30) with the sheriff to redeem.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A notice of default must be recorded in the county where the property is located and the borrower and/or occupant of the property must be served with a copy of the notice at least 120 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale date.
  2. A copy of the notice must be published once a week for four (4) successive weeks, with the last notice being published at least twenty (20) days prior to the foreclosure sale.
  3. Said notice must contain a property description, recording information on the trust deed, a description of the default, the sum owing on the loan, the lender’s election to sell and the date, time and place of sale.
  4. The borrower may cure the default at any time prior to foreclosure by paying all past due amounts, plus costs.
  5. The sale must be at auction to the highest bidder for cash. Any person, except the trustee, may bid at the sale, which take place between 9:00 am and 4:00 pm at the location stated in the notice of record.
  6. The sale may be postponed for up to 180 days from the original sale date if at least twenty (20) days advance notice is given, by mail, to the original recipients of the notice.

A deficiency judgment cannot be obtained through a non-judicial foreclosure, but may be pursued when other foreclosure methods are used.

More information on Oregon foreclosure laws.

 

Pennsylvania Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Pennsylvania, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

In Pennsylvania, the lender must send a notice of intent to foreclose to the borrower before any foreclosure proceedings may begin.

The notice of intent must be sent, by first class mail, to the borrower, at their last known address and if different, to the property secured by the mortgage. The notice should not be sent until the borrower is at least sixty (60) days behind in their mortgage payments.

In the notice, the lender must make the borrower aware that his or her mortgage is in default and that it is their (the lender’s) intention to accelerate the mortgage payments if the borrower does not cure the default within thirty (30) days. This means that the remaining balance of the original mortgage will come due immediately.

If the borrower does not cure the default by paying the past due amount, plus any late charges that have accrued, within the thirty (30) days, the lender may then file a suit to try and obtain a court order to foreclose on the property.

If the court finds in favor of the lender and issues an order of sale, the property will be sold at a Sheriff’s sale under the guidelines established by the court. The borrower has the right to cure the default and prevent the sale at any time up to one hour before the Sheriff’s foreclosure sale.

Lenders have up to six months after the foreclosure sale to file for a deficiency judgment. Borrowers have no rights of redemption once the foreclosure sale is complete.

More information on Pennsylvania foreclosure laws.

 

Rhode Island Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies by Process

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Rhode Island, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default: 1) by using the judicial foreclosure process; 2) by filing a lawsuit seeking eviction; 3) by taking possession of the house; 4) by the borrower voluntarily giving up possession; or 5) by using the non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Special Procedures

In instances where the lender takes possession of the house, they must do so peaceably and in the presence of two witnesses. Said witnesses must give a certificate of possession, which must then be notarized. Additionally, borrowers who voluntarily give up possession of the property must do so in the presence of a notary. In these instances, the lender will obtain the full title to the property if they are able to maintain possession for an established period of time.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. The lender must mail a written notice of the time and place of sale, by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the borrower at his or her last known address, at least twenty (20) days prior to the first publication, including the day of mailing in the computation.
  2. The lender must give notice of the sale by publication in some public newspaper at least once a week for three (3) successive weeks before the sale, with the first publication of the notice being at least twenty-one (21) days before the day of sale, including the day of the first publication in the computation.
  3. Said notice must contain the names of the borrower and lender, the mortgage date, the amount due, a description of the premises and the time and place of sale.

Any person may bid at the sale, including the lender.

More information on Rhode Island foreclosure laws.

 

South Carolina Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Primary Security Instrument: Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In South Carolina, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold.

In South Carolina, the property is generally sold in the following manner:

  1. A notice of sale, containing a description of the property, the time and place of sale, the borrowers name and the lenders name, must be published at the courthouse door and two other public places at least three weeks prior to the date of sale. The notice must also be published in a newspaper of general circulation within the county where the property resides for the same time period.
  2. Unless otherwise ordered by the court, the sale must be conducted at the courthouse where the property is located by the sheriff of said county. The sale must be held on the first Monday in each month, unless it is a holiday and then the sale may take place on the following Tuesday. The sale may begin at 11:00 am and go until 5:00 pm, but the sheriff may close the bidding prior to that time.
  3. Despite the fact that the bidding at the public sale has ended, in South Carolina, the auction actually stays open for a full thirty days after the date of the public sale. During this thirty day time period, anyone may place a bid higher than the last bid amount and the successful purchaser will be the one with the highest bid at the end of the thirty days. This ongoing bid process is referred to as upset bidding. Anyone, other than the successful purchaser, who has placed a bid during this time, will be entitled to a refund of any deposit made in good faith and he or she will have no further interest in the property.
  4. If no objection to the sale price of the property has been filed with the sheriff’s office within three months after the date of sale, the sale will be considered confirmed and the sheriff will make any necessary deed endorsements.

Lenders in South Carolina may file for a deficiency judgment against the borrower and borrowers have no rights of redemption.

More information on South Carolina foreclosure laws.

 

South Dakota Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Varies

In South Dakota, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, your home will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A foreclosure notice must be published once a week for four successive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the premises are located.
  2. At least twenty-one days prior to the date set for sale, the lender must serve a written copy of the notice of foreclosure sale on the borrower and any lien holder whose interest in the property being foreclosed would be affected by the foreclosure.
  3. Said notice must contain the names of the borrower and lender, the mortgage date, the amount due, a description of the premises and the time and place of sale.
  4. The sale must be made by the sheriff of such county, or his deputy, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm to the highest bidder. Any person including the mortgagee (lender) may bid at the sale. The winning bidder will receive a certificate of sale.
  5. The sale may be postponed, from time to time, by inserting a notice of such postponement, as soon as possible, in the newspaper in which the original advertisement was published, and continuing such publication until the time when the postponed sale occurs.

If the property is 40 acres or less, and the mortgage contains a power of sale clause, then a 180-day period of redemption exists. If the property is abandoned, the time period is reduced to 60 days. Generally, unless special short-term redemption mortgage provisions apply, borrowers may redeem within one year of the date of sale.

More information on South Dakota foreclosure laws.

Tennessee Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Tennessee, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure

process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A notice of sale must be published at least three (3) different times in a newspaper published in the county where the sale is to be made, with the first publication appearing at least twenty (20) days prior to the sale.
  2. Unless otherwise ordered, if no newspaper is published in said county, the notice of sale must be posted at least thirty (30) days in advance of the sale in at least five (5) public places within the county. At least one of these notices must be placed at the courthouse door and another in the neighborhood of the property itself.
  3. A notice of sale must also be served upon the borrower at least twenty (20) days prior to the date of sale if the borrower is in possession of the property.
  4. The sale must be held between the hours of 10:00 am and 4:00 pm for cash to the highest bidder. The sheriff of each county in the state of Tennessee may set a minimum acceptable price for the property as long as the price is equal to or greater than fifty percent (50%) of the fair market value.
  5. The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale will receive a certificate of sale and may be entitled to receive a deed once the borrowers right of redemption has expired.

Deficiency judgments are allowed in Tennessee and the borrower has a period of two (2) years to redeem the property, unless their right of redemption was waived in the original deed of trust.

More information on Tennessee foreclosure laws.

 

Texas Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

 

In Texas, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

 

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. Prior to proceeding with a foreclosure, Texas laws state that the lender must mail the borrower a letter of demand, informing the buyer he has twenty (20) days to pay the delinquent payments or foreclosure proceedings will begin.
  2. At some point after the borrowers twenty (20) days have expired, but at least twenty one (21) days before the foreclosure sale, a foreclosure notice must be: 1) filed with the county clerk; 2) mailed to the borrower at their last known address; and 3) posted on the county courthouse door.
  3. The foreclosure sale must take place on the first Tuesday of any month, even if said Tuesday falls on a legal holiday, but only after the proper preliminary notices have been given. The sale is on the courthouse steps by auction to the highest bidder for cash. Anyone may bid, including the lender, who bids by canceling out the balance due on the note, or some part of it.

Lenders may obtain deficiency judgments, but they are limited to the difference between the fair market value of the property at the time of sale and the balance of the loan in default.

More information on Texas foreclosure laws.

Utah Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instrument: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Varies

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

 

In Utah, lenders may foreclose on a mortgage in default by using the judicial foreclosure process.

 

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial foreclosure process is one in which the lender must file a complaint against the borrower and obtain a decree of sale from a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located before foreclosure proceedings can begin. Generally, if the court finds the borrower in default, they will give them a set period of time to pay the delinquent amount, plus costs. If the borrower does not pay within the set period of time, the court will then order the property to be sold in the manner of normal execution sales.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. A notice of sale must be published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the property is to be sold. The last publication must be at least ten (10) days but not more than thirty (30) days before the date of sale is scheduled.
  2. The notice of sale must also be posted, at least twenty (20) days before the date of sale is scheduled, in some conspicuous place on the property to be sold and at the office of the county recorder of each county in which the property is located.
  3. The place of sale must be clearly advertised in the notice of sale and the sale must be held between the hours of 8 am and 5 pm.
  4. Borrowers do have a right of redemption in Utah, but the court may extend the redemption time past the time allowed in regular judgments so there is no set length of time.

It is possible to obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower for the difference between the amount the borrower owed on the original loan and the foreclosure sale price and the lender may be able to seize the property until the differing amount is paid.

More information on Utah foreclosure laws.

Vermont Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 210 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Vermont, lenders may foreclose on mortgages or deeds of trust in default using the strict or the power of sale foreclosure process.

Strict Foreclosure

The strict foreclosure process is based on the premise that the lender owns the property until the mortgage has been paid in full. If the borrower breaks any of the conditions established in the mortgage prior to the time the loan is paid in full, he or she will lose any right to the property and the lender will either take possession of the property or arrange for it’s sale. In Vermont, a suit must be filed in the county where the property is located before either of these actions can occur. The borrower will be served a summons to appear before the court and informed of his rights, at which time the lender may move for a summary judgment and avoid the trial altogether.

Regardless, the borrower has either a six (6) month (post-1968 mortgages) or a twelve (12) month (pre-1968 mortgages)

redemption period.

Power of Sale Foreclosure

A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee.

In Vermont, power of sale foreclosures are conducted either judicially or non-judicially, depending on the type of property securing the deed of trust or mortgage.

Judicial Foreclosure

In Vermont, lenders who wish to obtain a foreclosure using the power of sale clause in the deed of trust must first file a complaint in a court having jurisdiction in the county where the property is located to try and obtain a decree of sale. This form of foreclosure must be used when the property includes a dwelling of two units or less, with the owner using said property as their principal residence. The sale of this type of property may not be held until seven (7) months after the decree of sale has been issued.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

In Vermont, when a power of sale is contained in a mortgage relating to any property except for a dwelling house of two units or less, that is occupied by the owner as a principal residence, or farmland, the lender may exercise the power of sale without first commencing a foreclosure action or obtaining a foreclosure decree.

Power of Sale Guidelines

  1. At least thirty (30) days prior to the publication of a notice of sale, a notice of intent to foreclose must be sent to the borrower by registered or certified mail at his or her last known address. The notice of intent must include information on the mortgage to be foreclosed, state the condition breached and the lenders right to accelerate the mortgage, and include the total amount necessary to cure the default. The borrower must also be informed that he or she is entitled to receive a notice of sale at least sixty (60) days prior to the date of sale.
  2. The borrower may redeem the property at any time prior to the foreclosure sale by paying the full amount due on the mortgage, plus costs.
  3. The sale must be held on the property itself, unless otherwise ordered by the court, and the property must be sold to the highest bidder. Anyone may bid at the sale, including the lender. The borrower is entitled to receive any surplus from the sale, but they may also be sued for deficiency if the sale price is not enough to cover the amount of the mortgage in default.
  4. If the property is sold without court action, as in non-judicial foreclosure by power of sale, the notice of sale must include the following language:
  5. “The mortgagor is hereby notified that at any time before the foreclosure sale, the mortgagor has a right to petition the superior court for the county in which the mortgaged premises are situated, with service upon the mortgagee, and upon such bond as the court may require, to enjoin the scheduled foreclosure sale. Failure to institute such petition and complete service upon the foreclosing party, or their agent, conducting the sale prior to sale shall thereafter bar any action or right of action of the mortgagor based on the validity of the foreclosure, the right of the mortgage holder to conduct the foreclosure sale, or compliance by the mortgage holder with the notice requirements and other conditions of section 4532 of Title 12. An action to recover damages resulting from the sale of the premises on the date of the sale may be commenced at any time within one year following the date of the sale, but not thereafter.”

More information on Vermont foreclosure laws.

 

Virginia Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: Varies

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Virginia, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

The borrower has two hundred forty (240) days from the date of the sale to redeem the property by paying the amount for which the property was sold, plus six (6) percent interest.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

  1. If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. However, additional requirements must be met, as outlined below in section one (1).Even when the deed of trust makes allowances for advertising the foreclosure sale, Virginia Statutes require ads to be published no less than once a day for three days, which may be consecutive days. These requirements are in addition to the advertising terms stipulated in the deed of trust. If the deed of trust does not provide for advertising, then the ad shall be run once a week for four successive weeks. However, near a city, an ad on five different days, which may be consecutive, will be sufficient.

    A copy of the advertisement or a notice with the same information must be mailed to the borrower at least 14 days before the foreclosure sale.

  2. The foreclosure sale ad must include anything required by the deed of trust and may include a legal description of the property, a street address and a tax map identification or general information about the property’s location. The notice must include the time, place and terms of sale. It must give the name of the trustee and the address and phone number of a person who will be able to respond to inquiries about the foreclosure sale.Any time before the sale, the borrower may cure the default and stop the sale by paying the lien debt, costs and reasonable attorney’s fees.
  3. The sale, which may be held no earlier than eight (8) days after the first ad is published and no more than thirty (30) days after the last advertisement is published, is to be made at auction to the highest bidder. Any person other than the trustee may bid at the foreclosure sale, including a person who has submitted a written one-price bid. Written one-price bids may be made and shall be received by the trustee for entry by announcement of the trustee at the sale. Any bidder in attendance may inspect written bids. Additionally, the trustee may require bidders to place a cash deposit of up to ten (10) percent of the sale price, unless the dead of trust specifies a higher or lower amount.In the event of postponement of sale, which may be done at the discretion of the trustee, advertisement of such postponed sale shall be in the same manner as the original advertisement of sale.
  4. Once the sale is complete, the proceeds will go to: 1) the expenses of executing the trust; 2) to discharge all taxes, levies, and assessments, with costs and interest if they have priority over the lien of the deed of trust; 3) to discharge in the order of their priority, if any, the remaining debts and obligations secured by the deed, and any liens of record inferior to the deed of trust under which sale is made; 4) any remaining proceeds go to the borrower.

Lenders may obtain deficiency judgments, without limits, in Virginia.

More information on Virginia foreclosure laws.

 

Washington Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 120 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes, but may be precluded.

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Washington, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. The notice of sale must be transmitted both by regular mail and by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the borrower at their last known address, and by regular mail to the attorney of record for the borrower, if any, not less than thirty (30) days prior to the day of sale.The sheriff must publish a notice of the sale once a week, consecutively, for four (4) weeks, in any daily or weekly legal newspaper of of general circulation published in the county in which the property is located. Additionally, the sheriff must also post the notice in two public places, one of which must be the courthouse door, in the county where the sale is to take place for a period of not less than four weeks prior to the day of sale.

    Said notice must contain the time and place of the foreclosure sale, the names of the parties to the deed, the date of the deed, recording information, a property description, the terms of the sale, and the borrowers rights (or lack of) redemption.

  2. The borrower has up to eleven (11) days before the sale stop the foreclosure process by paying the past due payments, plus expenses, including trustee and attorney fees.
  3. The sale must be made by auction between 9:00 am in the morning and 4:00 am in the afternoon at the courthouse door on Friday unless Friday is a legal holiday and then the sale must be held on the next following regular business day. The sale may not be conducted less than 190 days from the date of default and the highest bidder will receive a certificate of sale.The sheriff may postpone the sale (not exceeding one (1) week next after the day appointed) by giving notice and by posting written notices of the adjournment under the notices of sale originally posted.

Unless redemption rights have been precluded, the borrower may, within eight (8) months after the date of the sale, redeem the property by paying the amount of the highest bid at the foreclosure, plus interest.

If the non-judicial foreclosure process is used by the lender, then it cannot sue for a deficiency judgment. On judicial foreclosure sales, the borrower can be sued for a deficiency, unless the property is found to be abandoned for six (6) months before the decree of foreclosure.

More information on Washington foreclosure laws

 

District of Columbia Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: No

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Washington D.C., lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts in default using the non-judicial foreclosure process.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed.

If the terms of the sale are not established in the deed of trust, the lender, or his representative, must obtain a court order specifying the terms of the sale.

However, no foreclosure sale may take place unless the lender gives written notice, by certified mail (return receipt requested), to the borrower at his last known address. This notice must also be sent to the Mayor of the District of Columbia, or his designated agent. Both notices must be sent at least thirty (30) days prior to the sale, with the thirty (30) day period beginning on the day the notice is received by the Mayor. This notice must be given in addition to any notices set forth by the court, the mortgage or the deed of trust.

In Washington D.C., lenders may obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower for the difference between the foreclosure sale amount and the amount remaining on the original loan. The borrower has no rights of redemption.

More information on Washington D.C.’s foreclosure laws.

 

West Virginia Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 60 days

–  Right of Redemption: No

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: No

In West Virginia, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. The notice of sale must be posted on the front door of the courthouse for the county in which the property to be sold is located, and three (3) other public places, one of which must be the property itself, at least twenty (20) days prior to sale. The notice must also be served upon the borrower and subordinate lien holders at least twenty (20) days prior to the foreclosure sale.Additionally, the notice must be published as a Class III legal advertisement in the county where the property is located once a week for four (4) weeks.

    Said notice must contain the time and place of the foreclosure sale, the names of the parties to the deed, the date of the deed, recording information, a property description and the terms of the sale.

  2. The sale must be held at the time and place stated in the foreclosure notice and completed by public auction to the highest bidder. Unless the deed specifies the terms of sale, the buyer must pay one-third (1/3) of the bid amount in cash at the sale.

Deficiency actions are generally not permitted in West Virginia and there are no rights of redemption.

More information on West Virginia foreclosure laws.

 

Wisconsin Foreclosure Law

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Wisconsin, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder. However, in Wisconsin, no sale may be made for one year from the date the judgment is entered unless the lender waives the right to a deficiency, in which case the delay is six months, or two months if the property is abandoned. Sales by consent may be earlier.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. The foreclosure notice must be recorded with the county prior to the time the first notice of foreclosure is published. The notice, which must include the time and place of sale, must be published once a week for six consecutive weeks in a newspaper in the county where the property is located.The notice must be served upon the borrower in the same manner that civil process in a lawsuit is served. In instances where the borrower can’t be found, then the notice shall be posted in a conspicuous spot on the mortgaged premises and served on any occupant.

    Said notice must specify the names of the borrower and lender, the date the mortgage was recorded, the amount due at the date of the notice, a property description and the time and place of sale.

  2. The sale must be held at the time and place stated in the foreclosure notice. The winning bidder will receive a certificate of purchase. If necessary, the sale may be postponed.
  3. Unless the foreclosure sale has been confirmed by court order, the borrower has one year (12 months) to redeem the property by paying the amount of the highest bid at the foreclosure sale, plus interest.

Wisconsin law allows a foreclosure sale to be confirmed by court order. If the lender states their intentions in the application for sales confirmation, then they may file a deficiency suit. Otherwise, deficiency suits are not allowed.

More information on Wisconsin foreclosure laws.

 

Wyoming Foreclosure Law

 

–  Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Non-Judicial Foreclosure Available: Yes

–  Primary Security Instruments: Deed of Trust, Mortgage

–  Timeline: Typically 90 days

–  Right of Redemption: Yes

–  Deficiency Judgments Allowed: Yes

In Wyoming, lenders may foreclose on deeds of trusts or mortgages in default using either a judicial or non-judicial foreclosure process.

Judicial Foreclosure

The judicial process of foreclosure, which involves filing a lawsuit to obtain a court order to foreclose, is used when no power of sale is present in the mortgage or deed of trust. Generally, after the court declares a foreclosure, the property will be auctioned off to the highest bidder.

Non-Judicial Foreclosure

The non-judicial process of foreclosure is used when a power of sale clause exists in a mortgage or deed of trust. A “power of

sale” clause is the clause in a deed of trust or mortgage, in which the borrower pre-authorizes the sale of property to pay off the balance on a loan in the event of the their default. In deeds of trust or mortgages where a power of sale exists, the power given to the lender to sell the property may be executed by the lender or their representative, typically referred to as the trustee. Regulations for this type of foreclosure process are outlined below in the “Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines”.

Power of Sale Foreclosure Guidelines

If the deed of trust or mortgage contains a power of sale clause and specifies the time, place and terms of sale, then the specified procedure must be followed. Otherwise, the non-judicial power of sale foreclosure is carried out as follows:

  1. Written notice of intent to foreclose the mortgage by advertisement and sale must be served upon the record owner, and the person in possession of the mortgaged premises (if different than the record owner), by certified mail with return receipt, at least ten (10) days before the first publication of notice of sale.The notice must be published at least once a week for four (4) consecutive weeks in a newspaper printed in the county where the property is located. If there is no newspaper printed in the county, then the notice must be published in a paper printed in the state and of general circulation in said county.

    Said notice must specify the name of the borrower, the lender and the lender’s representative, the date of the mortgage and when it was recorded, the amount of the default, a description of the property and the time and place of sale.

  2. The sale must be held at the front door of the courthouse of the county in which the premises to be sold, or some part of them, are situated, between the hours of 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, and must be conducted by the person appointed for that purpose in the mortgage or by the sheriff or deputy sheriff of the county. Anyone may bid, including the lender. The highest bidder will receive a certificate of purchase.Such sale may be postponed from time to time by inserting a notice as soon as possible in the newspaper in which the original advertisement was published and continuing such publication until the time to which the sale shall be postponed, at the expense of the party requesting such postponement.
  3. The borrower has three (3) months from the date of sale to redeem the property by paying the amount of the purchase price or the amount given or bid if purchased by the execution creditor or by the mortgagee under a mortgage, together with interest at the rate of ten percent (10%) from the date of sale plus the amount of any assessments or taxes and the amount due on any prior lien which the purchaser paid after the purchase, with interest.

Lenders may obtain deficiency judgments in Wyoming.

More information on Wyoming foreclosure laws.

  • Turnkey Lawsuit Package

  • $1495

  • FRAUD STOPPERS Private Members Association Membership
  • Mortgage Fraud Analysis
  • Potential Cause of Action Consultation
  • Federal Debt Validation Letter(s)
  • Error Resolution & Information Request (ERIR) Letter
  • Qualified Written Request (QWR) Letter
  • Federal TILA Rescission Letter
  • Tort Letter to Stop Foreclosure Sale
  • Bankruptcy Package
  • Bonus Reports
  • Federal FDCPA Complaint
  • Securitization Audit
  • Mortgage Forensic Audit
  • Chain of Title Analysis
  • Turnkey Compliant
  • EXPERT WITNESS AFFIDAVIT
  • Robo Signing Analysis
  • Temporary Restraining Order
  • Lis Pendens
  • Expert Witness Testimony
  • How to Win in Court Pro Se Education Course
  • Pro Se Litigation Support
  • Mediation Negotiation Settlement Services
  • BUY NOW
  • Mortgage Fraud Audit

  • $995

  • FRAUD STOPPERS Private Members Association Membership
  • Mortgage Fraud Analysis
  • Potential Cause of Action Consultation
  • Federal Debt Validation Letter(s)
  • Error Resolution & Information Request (ERIR) Letter
  • Qualified Written Request (QWR) Letter
  • Federal TILA Rescission Letter
  • Tort Letter to Stop Foreclosure Sale
  • Bankruptcy Package
  • Bonus Reports
  • Federal FDCPA Complaint
  • Securitization Audit
  • Mortgage Forensic Audit
  • Chain of Title Analysis
  • Turnkey Compliant
  • EXPERT WITNESS AFFIDAVIT
  • Robo Signing Analysis
  • Temporary Restraining Order
  • Lis Pendens
  • Expert Witness Testimony
  • How to Win in Court Pro Se Education Course
  • Pro Se Litigation Support
  • Mediation Negotiation Settlement Services
  • BUY NOW
  • PMA Membership

  • $295

  • FRAUD STOPPERS Private Members Association Membership
  • Mortgage Fraud Analysis
  • Potential Cause of Action Consultation
  • Federal Debt Validation Letter(s)
  • Error Resolution & Information Request (ERIR) Letter
  • Qualified Written Request (QWR) Letter
  • Federal TILA Rescission Letter
  • Tort Letter to Stop Foreclosure Sale
  • Bankruptcy Package
  • Bonus Reports
  • Federal FDCPA Complaint
  • Securitization Audit
  • Mortgage Forensic Audit
  • Chain of Title Analysis
  • Turnkey Compliant
  • EXPERT WITNESS AFFIDAVIT
  • Robo Signing Analysis
  • Temporary Restraining Order
  • Lis Pendens
  • Expert Witness Testimony
  • How to Win in Court Pro Se Education Course
  • Pro Se Litigation Support
  • Mediation Negotiation Settlement Services
  • BUY NOW

 

Alabama Foreclosure Law, Alaska Foreclosure Law, Arizona Foreclosure Law, Arkansas Foreclosure Law, California Foreclosure Law, Colorado Foreclosure Law, Connecticut Foreclosure Law, Delaware Foreclosure Law, Florida Foreclosure Law, Georgia Foreclosure Law, Hawaii Foreclosure Law, Idaho Foreclosure Law, Illinois Foreclosure Law, Indiana Foreclosure Law, Iowa Foreclosure Law, Kansas Foreclosure Law, Kentucky Foreclosure Law, Louisiana Foreclosure Law, Maine Foreclosure Law, Maryland Foreclosure Law, Massachusetts Foreclosure Law, Michigan Foreclosure Law, Minnesota Foreclosure Law, Mississippi Foreclosure Law, Missouri Foreclosure Law, Montana Foreclosure Law, Nebraska Foreclosure Law, Nevada Foreclosure Law, New Hampshire Foreclosure Law, New Jersey Foreclosure Law, New Mexico Foreclosure Law, New York Foreclosure Law, North Carolina Foreclosure Law, North Dakota Foreclosure Law, Ohio Foreclosure Law, Oklahoma Foreclosure Law, Oregon Foreclosure Law, Pennsylvania Foreclosure Law, Rhode Island Foreclosure Law, South Carolina Foreclosure Law, South Dakota Foreclosure Law, Tennessee Foreclosure Law, Texas Foreclosure Law, Utah Foreclosure Law, Vermont Foreclosure Law, Virginia Foreclosure Law, Washington Foreclosure Law, Washington D.C. Foreclosure Law, West Virginia Foreclosure Law, Wisconsin Foreclosure Law, Wyoming Foreclosure Law,

Referral Affiliate Video

FRAUD STOPPERS Referral Affiliate Programs

FRAUD STOPPERS Referral Affiliate Programs

Stop Foreclosure & Mortgage Fraud Fast, Sue the Banks & Make Money Helping Others Do the Same

Stop Foreclosure & Mortgage Fraud Fast Fraud Stoppers

Stop Foreclosure & Mortgage Fraud Fast Fraud Stoppers

Free Foreclosure EBook

FRAUD STOPPERS Foreclosure Traps Pitfalls and Swindles

FRAUD STOPPERS Foreclosure Traps Pitfalls and Swindles

JOIN FRAUD STOPPERS PMA

How to Win in Court

Fraud Stoppers How to Win in Court

Credit Repair

FRAUD STOPPERS Credit Repair

Bloomberg Securitization Audits

securitized table funded loans

securitized table funded loans

Mortgage Calculator

Loan Calculator Mortgage Calculator
Mortgage CalculatorLoan CalculatorLoan Calculator

$

years

%

Social Media Buttons

VISIT US AT

face book youtubeg+ twitter

American Justice League

Rule of Law Radio

Rule of Law Radio

Pro Bono Attorneys

Process Service

Blog

FRAUD STOPPERS PMA Mortgage Foreclosure Defense Blog

 

 

For information on foreclosure defense call us at 800-459-1215. We offer litigation support, admissible evidence, expert witness testimony, education, training, and support in all 50 states to attorneys and pro se homeowners.

 

 

 

DON'T LET THE BANKS TRICK YOU!

Get the FACTS & Evidence to win the legal remedy that you deserve today.

get-started-now

 

 

 

FRAUD STOPPERS Can Help You Stop Foreclosure and Mortgage Fraud

If you or anyone you know is facing foreclosure, or has already lost a property to foreclosure, and want to sue for mortgage fraudforeclosure fraud, wrongful foreclosure, or quiet title to your home FRAUD STOPPERS PMA can help you save time and money and increase your odds of success getting the legal remedy that you deserve. If you have received a Notice of Default (NOD) or a Foreclosure Notice (Foreclosure Complaint) and you want to know how to respond to the Notice of Default (NOD) or a Foreclosure Notice (Foreclosure Complaint) join FRAUD STOPPERS PMA today because FRAUD STOPPERS has a proven system to help you fight to save your home from foreclosure and sue for mortgage fraud. FRAUD STOPPERS turnkey Quiet Title Lawsuit package or Wrongful Foreclosure Lawsuit package includes a court ready complaint (petition for damages), Bloomberg Securitization Audit, Expert Witness Affidavit, Application for Temporary Restraining Order (to stop a foreclosure sale or stop an eviction), Lis Pendens (to cloud the marketability of the title to the real property), and Pro Se legal education material that can show you how to win a Quiet Title Lawsuit or win a Wrongful Foreclosure Lawsuit. This entire court ready Quiet Title Lawsuit Package or Wrongful Foreclosure Lawsuit Package can help you save money in legal fees and help you increase your odds of success. Join FRAUD STOPPERS PMA today and get mortgage fraud analysis and the facts and evidence you need to get the legal remedy you deserve at www.fraudstopper.org/pma

 

 

FRAUD STOPPERS PMA

Feel free to connect with us . . .

Address: Birch Tree MO 65438
Phone: 800-459-1215
Email: Info@FraudStoppers.org

 

 

 

Fraud Stoppers Logo

DISCLOSURE: NOTICE OF Copyright © 2019  FRAUD STOPPERS, FRAUD STOPPERS PMA. Disclaimer: Any information or answers are provided for informational purposes only, does not constitute legal advice, and does not create PMA-Member relationship. THIS SITE IS NOT INTENDED TO BE MISCONSTRUED AS LEGAL ADVICE. Legal Information is NOT Legal Advice: This site provides “information” that is only designed to help users safely cope with their own general legal needs. Legal information is NOT the same as legal advice — the application of law to an individual’s specific circumstances. FRAUD STOPPERS is a National Private Members Association (PMA). PLEASE TAKE NOTICE OF THE FOLLOWING MARS Disclosure[s] 12 C.F.R. 1015.: (1) FRAUD STOPPERS PMA is NOT Affiliated with any Government Agency or Any Bank Lender; (2) Even if YOU Accept any of  FRAUD STOPPERS PMA Products or Services Your Lender May Choose to NOT Change Your Loan.  FRAUD STOPPERS products and services are only available to Active Members of the FRAUD STOPPERS PRIVATE MEMBERS ASSOCIATION. To join FRAUD STOPPERS PMA click here: https://www.fraudstoppers.org/members-only/

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Visit Us
Follow Me
Tweet
close

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)

Visit Us
Follow Me
Tweet